Shaping Soaps, Shaping Rightly

The basis of silicone is silicon. Silicon is the second most prevalent element on earth. The surface of the earth consists up to 28% of silicon, it can be found in stones, clay and sand. Silicone is a silicon molecule.

In medical science, silicone is used as a component of numerous products, e.g. probes, catheters, coatings of puncture needles and pace makers, gloves and wound dressings. In soft-tissue surgery, silicone implants are used for body contour correction.

The first production process for silicone polymers was patented in 1958. Silicone or, as chemists call it, polydimethylsiloxane, is produced as silicone elastomer, silicone gel and silicone oil.

We encounter silicone every day: as anti-foaming agents for cooking, as water-repellent for clothing, as electrical insulation, as anti-acids for the stomach, as carrier spray in antiperspirants, as the shine in cosmetics, etc. Silicone does not contain any additives, especially softeners. Intensive studies have not provided evidence of allergic reactions to silicone.

The use of silicone material is widespread and we are constantly exposed to silicone in every day life. Silicone is used in food processing (for example, canning and ready meals), as sealants and in domestic and personal products such as cleaning solvents, hand cream, hair and skin products, and antiperspirants.

Silicone is also incorporated into medicines and in a wide range of medical devices. For example, silicone oil is commonly used as a lubricant in syringes and blood giving sets. Silicones are also used during surgery to repair retinal detachment and are used as implants in ears, noses, breast etc.

The silicone that Mölnlycke Health Care uses is soft and flows over the uneven surface of the skin and creates a far larger effective contact area with the skin compared with other adhesives.

On removal, the soft silicone adhesive distributes the forces over a large area of skin under the dressing. This property minimises damage to surrounding skin and even after repeated removal, no stripping of epidermal cells will occur.

The silicone used in the dressings with Safetac® has the following properties –

  • Low surface tension
  • Soft and flexible· “Tacky”
  • Inert and non-toxic

Now, go through our reference links –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

For That Dot Perfect Shape – Silicone Molds

The basis of silicone is silicon. Silicon is the second most prevalent element on earth. The surface of the earth consists up to 28% of silicon, it can be found in stones, clay and sand. Silicone is a silicon molecule.

In medical science, silicone is used as a component of numerous products, e.g. probes, catheters, coatings of puncture needles and pace makers, gloves and wound dressings. In soft-tissue surgery, silicone implants are used for body contour correction.

The first production process for silicone polymers was patented in 1958. Silicone or, as chemists call it, polydimethylsiloxane, is produced as silicone elastomer, silicone gel and silicone oil.

We encounter silicone every day: as anti-foaming agents for cooking, as water-repellent for clothing, as electrical insulation, as anti-acids for the stomach, as carrier spray in antiperspirants, as the shine in cosmetics, etc. Silicone does not contain any additives, especially softeners. Intensive studies have not provided evidence of allergic reactions to silicone.

The use of silicone material is widespread and we are constantly exposed to silicone in every day life. Silicone is used in food processing (for example, canning and ready meals), as sealants and in domestic and personal products such as cleaning solvents, hand cream, hair and skin products, and antiperspirants.

Silicone is also incorporated into medicines and in a wide range of medical devices. For example, silicone oil is commonly used as a lubricant in syringes and blood giving sets. Silicones are also used during surgery to repair retinal detachment and are used as implants in ears, noses, breast etc.

The silicone that Mölnlycke Health Care uses is soft and flows over the uneven surface of the skin and creates a far larger effective contact area with the skin compared with other adhesives.

On removal, the soft silicone adhesive distributes the forces over a large area of skin under the dressing. This property minimises damage to surrounding skin and even after repeated removal, no stripping of epidermal cells will occur.

The silicone used in the dressings with Safetac® has the following properties –

  • Low surface tension
  • Soft and flexible· “Tacky”
  • Inert and non-toxic

Now, go through our reference links –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Boosting Shapes – Silicone Molds

Silicones contain silicon as a primary atom in their structure. The recent public debate about the use of silicones in medical devices and recent scientific and medical literature highlights the confusion surrounding the meaning of these terms and how they are related.

Published research describing the presence of silicone in terms of measured silicon in a variety of samples such as biopsies and urine can also be difficult to follow. A fundamental understanding of a few definitions can help clinicians and researchers in interpreting and clearly communicating technical information to patients and the public. The definitions and illustrations that follow can be used to achieve this objective.

The low surface tension (hydrophobic nature) of the soft silicone secures a non-sticking property of the dressing even when a wound goes from wet to dry ensuring atraumatic removal. The “tackiness” in combination with the softness and the flexibility gives the gentle adhesion to the dry skin causing no stripping on removal1. Silicone is well tolerated on the wound and on the surrounding skin due to its inertness and non-toxic nature.

All these properties make the soft silicone products ideal in wound care products.

Silicone is a rubbery substance that looks similar to very fine sand. It can be used for a variety of applications and in a variety of forms depending on how the silicone is treated and what chemicals are added. Silicone can be molded into –

  • Cookware
  • Used as caulking
  • Be pressurized into a spray

Each form of silicone meets specific needs. Silicone spray can be used in several different applications.

Silicone spray is resistant to water so it can be used to protect items from moisture. Boat owners use silicone spray on exposed boat metals to help inhibit the development of rust. If sprayed on material, silicone spray will soak into the material and help water bead up and roll off the material.

Have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Pin-Pointing The Goods Of Silicone Molds

While often maligned, silicones are actually one of the most effective ingredients in both hair and skin care products. Silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (waterproof) coating.

It really depends on the type of silicone. There are several different silicones used in hair care that exhibit different properties.

Cyclomethicone is one of the most commonly used silicones in hair care. It’s a volatile silicone, which means it evaporates and won’t build up on your hair. It gives a silky, smooth feel and leaves the hair with incredible slip when wet and is found in both leave-on and rinse-off products.

Dimethicone Copolyol is –

  • Water-soluble
  • Lightweight silicone
  • Provides very little buildup

It is often used in conditioning shampoos.

Amodimethicone (or silicones that have “amo”, “amine” or “amino” in their name) is a different kind of silicone that is chemically modified to stick to your hair better. That means it conditions well but it can also be more challenging to remove. Amodimethicone is commonly used in leave-in conditioners.

Dimethicone is sometimes referred to as a silicone oil. Dimethicone coats hair, providing great shine and conditioning to the hair. However, because it’s so water insoluble, it can be difficult to remove.  Additionally, this heavy coating is more likely to attract dirt and pollutants from the air, making the hair feel weighed down.  Dimethicone is often found in serums and other leave-on products.

Wash your hair! Any decent shampoo will wash away silicone. However, if you are a heavy user or products containing silicone (particularly those with dimethicone), you may have to lather, rinse and repeat. If you want the benefits of silicone without the weight, look for lightweight silicones, as mentioned above, like cyclomethicone and dimethicone copolyol. These ingredients won’t build up but still give you some conditioning and shine benefits.

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Silicone Soap Mold – For Best Of Products

Silicone molds are possibly the best bet for being used for shaping candles and soaps. And actually, this is not all that silicone does, the list of it’s properties and uses is endless and really impressive.

The basis of silicone is silicon. Silicon is the second most prevalent element on earth. The surface of the earth consists up to 28% of silicon, it can be found in stones, clay and sand. Silicone is a silicon molecule.

In medical science, silicone is used as a component of numerous products, e.g. probes, catheters, coatings of puncture needles and pace makers, gloves and wound dressings. In soft-tissue surgery, silicone implants are used for body contour correction.

The first production process for silicone polymers was patented in 1958. Silicone or, as chemists call it, polydimethylsiloxane, is produced as silicone elastomer, silicone gel and silicone oil.

We encounter silicone every day: as anti-foaming agents for cooking, as water-repellent for clothing, as electrical insulation, as anti-acids for the stomach, as carrier spray in antiperspirants, as the shine in cosmetics, etc. Silicone does not contain any additives, especially softeners. Intensive studies have not provided evidence of allergic reactions to silicone.

The use of silicone material is widespread and we are constantly exposed to silicone in every day life. Silicone is used in food processing (for example, canning and ready meals), as sealants and in domestic and personal products such as cleaning solvents, hand cream, hair and skin products, and antiperspirants.

Silicone is also incorporated into medicines and in a wide range of medical devices. For example, silicone oil is commonly used as a lubricant in syringes and blood giving sets. Silicones are also used during surgery to repair retinal detachment and are used as implants in ears, noses, breast etc.

The silicone that Mölnlycke Health Care uses is soft and flows over the uneven surface of the skin and creates a far larger effective contact area with the skin compared with other adhesives.

On removal, the soft silicone adhesive distributes the forces over a large area of skin under the dressing. This property minimises damage to surrounding skin and even after repeated removal, no stripping of epidermal cells will occur.

The silicone used in the dressings with Safetac® has the following properties –

  • Low surface tension
  • Soft and flexible· “Tacky”
  • Inert and non-toxic

Now, go through our reference links –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Silicone Molds’ Big Goods

Silicone can be used for a number of purposes. Talking of silicone molds, they are best for shaping molten soap and even wax. When things like these are used the right way, they work for longer periods of time.

While often maligned, silicones are actually one of the most effective ingredients in both hair and skin care products. Silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (waterproof) coating.

It really depends on the type of silicone. There are several different silicones used in hair care that exhibit different properties.

Cyclomethicone is one of the most commonly used silicones in hair care. It’s a volatile silicone, which means it evaporates and won’t build up on your hair. It gives a silky, smooth feel and leaves the hair with incredible slip when wet and is found in both leave-on and rinse-off products.

Dimethicone Copolyol is –

  • Water-soluble
  • Lightweight silicone
  • Provides very little buildup

It is often used in conditioning shampoos.

Amodimethicone (or silicones that have “amo”, “amine” or “amino” in their name) is a different kind of silicone that is chemically modified to stick to your hair better. That means it conditions well but it can also be more challenging to remove. Amodimethicone is commonly used in leave-in conditioners.

Dimethicone is sometimes referred to as a silicone oil. Dimethicone coats hair, providing great shine and conditioning to the hair. However, because it’s so water insoluble, it can be difficult to remove.  Additionally, this heavy coating is more likely to attract dirt and pollutants from the air, making the hair feel weighed down.  Dimethicone is often found in serums and other leave-on products.

Wash your hair! Any decent shampoo will wash away silicone. However, if you are a heavy user or products containing silicone (particularly those with dimethicone), you may have to lather, rinse and repeat. If you want the benefits of silicone without the weight, look for lightweight silicones, as mentioned above, like cyclomethicone and dimethicone copolyol. These ingredients won’t build up but still give you some conditioning and shine benefits.

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Shaping Soaps Using Silicone Soap Molds

Silicone can be used for a number of purposes. Talking of silicone molds, they are best for shaping molten soap and even wax. When things like these are used the right way, they work for longer periods of time.

While often maligned, silicones are actually one of the most effective ingredients in both hair and skin care products. Silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (waterproof) coating.

It really depends on the type of silicone. There are several different silicones used in hair care that exhibit different properties.

Cyclomethicone is one of the most commonly used silicones in hair care. It’s a volatile silicone, which means it evaporates and won’t build up on your hair. It gives a silky, smooth feel and leaves the hair with incredible slip when wet and is found in both leave-on and rinse-off products.

Dimethicone Copolyol is –

  • Water-soluble
  • Lightweight silicone
  • Provides very little buildup

It is often used in conditioning shampoos.

Amodimethicone (or silicones that have “amo”, “amine” or “amino” in their name) is a different kind of silicone that is chemically modified to stick to your hair better. That means it conditions well but it can also be more challenging to remove. Amodimethicone is commonly used in leave-in conditioners.

Dimethicone is sometimes referred to as a silicone oil. Dimethicone coats hair, providing great shine and conditioning to the hair. However, because it’s so water insoluble, it can be difficult to remove.  Additionally, this heavy coating is more likely to attract dirt and pollutants from the air, making the hair feel weighed down.  Dimethicone is often found in serums and other leave-on products.

Wash your hair! Any decent shampoo will wash away silicone. However, if you are a heavy user or products containing silicone (particularly those with dimethicone), you may have to lather, rinse and repeat. If you want the benefits of silicone without the weight, look for lightweight silicones, as mentioned above, like cyclomethicone and dimethicone copolyol. These ingredients won’t build up but still give you some conditioning and shine benefits.

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

All For You – Silicone Molds

Silicone also makes an appearance when it comes to cooking. As a component that is often found in parchment paper, the silicone prevents foods that are baked or broiled on the paper from sticking, such as with cookies, slices of bacon, or chicken breasts.

In addition, a number of the non-stick sprays used today have silicone as one of the ingredients, allowing the cook to not have to use oils or shortening to prevent sticking. This type of rubber also shows up in the kitchen in the form of spatulas, serving and stirring spoons, and even plastic cheese knives.

This material also has a number of uses outside the home, such as in –

  • Breast implants
  • Menstrual cups
  • Enclosures for electrical equipment
  • Fire stops used in the process of fire retardation

As time goes on, the number of ways this valuable compound can be used will no doubt continue to expand.

There are a lot of great hair products available to help us achieve the perfect ‘do. However, it does make you wonder if you can put too much stuff on your hair? Do certain ingredients build up over time? Silicone is a very commonly used hair care ingredient. so lets take a closer look at how it works.

While often maligned, silicones are actually one of the most effective ingredients in both hair and skin care products. Silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (waterproof) coating. This coating serves several purposes:

Reduces the porosity of the hair, which makes it less likely to absorb humidity (Which is why it’s great for smoothing and straightening!)

Reduces moisture loss from the inside of the hair (Great for conditioning.)

Lubricates the surface of the hair so it feel smoother and combs easier (Makes your hair feel slippery and less tangled.)

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

Silicone Molds – For Better Soap Shapes

While often maligned, silicones are actually one of the most effective ingredients in both hair and skin care products. Silicones work by covering hair with a thin hydrophobic (waterproof) coating.

It really depends on the type of silicone. There are several different silicones used in hair care that exhibit different properties.

Cyclomethicone is one of the most commonly used silicones in hair care. It’s a volatile silicone, which means it evaporates and won’t build up on your hair. It gives a silky, smooth feel and leaves the hair with incredible slip when wet and is found in both leave-on and rinse-off products.

Dimethicone Copolyol is –

  • Water-soluble
  • Lightweight silicone
  • Provides very little buildup

It is often used in conditioning shampoos.

Amodimethicone (or silicones that have “amo”, “amine” or “amino” in their name) is a different kind of silicone that is chemically modified to stick to your hair better. That means it conditions well but it can also be more challenging to remove. Amodimethicone is commonly used in leave-in conditioners.

Dimethicone is sometimes referred to as a silicone oil. Dimethicone coats hair, providing great shine and conditioning to the hair. However, because it’s so water insoluble, it can be difficult to remove.  Additionally, this heavy coating is more likely to attract dirt and pollutants from the air, making the hair feel weighed down.  Dimethicone is often found in serums and other leave-on products.

Wash your hair! Any decent shampoo will wash away silicone. However, if you are a heavy user or products containing silicone (particularly those with dimethicone), you may have to lather, rinse and repeat. If you want the benefits of silicone without the weight, look for lightweight silicones, as mentioned above, like cyclomethicone and dimethicone copolyol. These ingredients won’t build up but still give you some conditioning and shine benefits.

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff

For The Best Of Shaping Containers – Silicone Soap Molds

Silicones contain silicon as a primary atom in their structure. The recent public debate about the use of silicones in medical devices and recent scientific and medical literature highlights the confusion surrounding the meaning of these terms and how they are related.

Published research describing the presence of silicone in terms of measured silicon in a variety of samples such as biopsies and urine can also be difficult to follow. A fundamental understanding of a few definitions can help clinicians and researchers in interpreting and clearly communicating technical information to patients and the public. The definitions and illustrations that follow can be used to achieve this objective.

The low surface tension (hydrophobic nature) of the soft silicone secures a non-sticking property of the dressing even when a wound goes from wet to dry ensuring atraumatic removal. The “tackiness” in combination with the softness and the flexibility gives the gentle adhesion to the dry skin causing no stripping on removal1. Silicone is well tolerated on the wound and on the surrounding skin due to its inertness and non-toxic nature.

All these properties make the soft silicone products ideal in wound care products.

Silicone is a rubbery substance that looks similar to very fine sand. It can be used for a variety of applications and in a variety of forms depending on how the silicone is treated and what chemicals are added. Silicone can be molded into –

  • Cookware
  • Used as caulking
  • Be pressurized into a spray

Each form of silicone meets specific needs. Silicone spray can be used in several different applications.

Silicone spray is resistant to water so it can be used to protect items from moisture. Boat owners use silicone spray on exposed boat metals to help inhibit the development of rust. If sprayed on material, silicone spray will soak into the material and help water bead up and roll off the material.

Have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Silicone by ehow
  2. Silicone Soap Molds by Wise Geek
  3. What is Silicone by Women Stuff